Migraine Sufferers: This Could Be The Root Cause Of All Your Problems

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Up to one quarter of the population has a migraine headache at some time in their life and about 10 percent have them regularly.

They usually start in childhood or adolescence, are at their worst in the 30’s and 40’s and then decline. Very often they run in families.

The classic migraine begins with a warming “aura” – flashing lights in one eye, blurring, blind sports, distortion of vision, and tingling of the arms or face. After about 30-60 minutes the headache begins, usually on one side but sometimes all over. It is a pounding, excruciating pain which usually lasts for four to six hours.

The more common “common migraine” may lack the warning symptoms, and the headache may be far longer lasting, although equally awful. The patient can feel irritable or depressed for hours or even days beforehand. But symptoms vary widely – periods of paralysis, dizziness, or even loss of consciousness are all reported.

One good example that I recently learned of is that your digestive system could play a key role in the production of serotonin—a neurotransmitter closely related to migraine headaches—and also has several serotonin receptors.

These receptors respond to serotonin inhibitors. For example, people with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) have been found to respond very well to antidepressants, which inhibit serotonin—and they’re not taking them for depression, but for their IBS symptoms.

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What’s even more interesting is that people who suffer from migraine headaches typically have suffered from undiagnosed digestive issues long before the migraines showed up. One study I recently came across looked at the presence of food allergies in 500 migraine patients, and this is what the researchers found:

60% of the migraine patients had allergies to dairy
50% were allergic to grains
About 35% had allergies to eggs
Furthermore, many of the participants were unaware they even had these food allergies, because they experienced no symptoms in their digestive systems.

These results show there is a very close relationship between your gut and your head, and that what you eat—and the bacteria in your gut—can play a major role in the onset of headaches.

It’s quite possible that a healthy, balanced digestive system could help stave off headaches, and not just digestive discomfort.

To learn if you’re allergic to certain foods, go get an allergy test. It’s quite possible you could be allergic to foods without even noticing! Once you’ve done that, try a probiotic supplement and a balanced, healthy diet.

Fix your gut and it could save you from your next headache!

source : .grazeme.com

 

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